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Sunday, November 27, 2011

EAT FOR A HEALTHY HEART

Making healthy food choices is one important thing you can do to reduce your risk of heart disease—the leading cause of death of men and women in the United States. According to the American Heart Association, about 80 million adults in the U.S. have at least one form of heart disease—disorders that prevent the heart from functioning normally—including coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems, heart defects, infections, and cardiomyopathy (thickening or enlargement of the heart muscle).

HEALTHY HEART FOOD Experts say you can reduce the risk of developing these problems with lifestyle changes that include eating a healthy diet. But with racks full of books and magazines about food and recipes, what is the best diet for a healthy heart?

Food and Drug Administration nutrition expert (FDA's) Barbara Schneeman says to follow these simple guidelines when preparing meals:

  • Balance calories to manage body weight
  • Eat at least 4.5 cups of fruits and vegetables a day, including a variety of dark-green, red, and orange vegetables, beans, and peas.
  • Eat seafood (including oily fish) in place of some meat and poultry
  • Eat whole grains—the equivalent of at least three 1-ounce servings a day
  • Use oils to replace solid fats.
  • Use fat-free or low-fat versions of dairy products.

The government’s newly released “Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010” also says Americans should reduce their sodium intake. The general recommendation is to eat less than 2,300 mg. of sodium a day. But Americans 51 or older, African-Americans of any age, and people with high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease should restrict their intake to 1,500 mg. The government estimates that about half the U.S. population is in one of those three categories.

Packaged and Restaurant Food

Schneeman, who heads FDA's Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements, says one way to make sure you’re adhering to healthy guidelines is by using the nutrition labels on the packaged foods you buy.

“Product labels give consumers the power to compare foods quickly and easily so they can judge which products best fit into a heart healthy diet or meet other dietary needs,” Schneeman says. “Remember, when you see a percent DV (daily value of key nutrients) on the label, 5 percent or less is low and 20 percent or more is high.”

Follow these guidelines when using processed foods or eating in restaurants:

  • Choose lean meats and poultry. Bake it, broil it, or grill it.
  • In a restaurant, opt for steamed, grilled, or broiled dishes instead of those that are fried or sautéed.
  • Look on product labels for foods low in saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol. Most of the fats you eat should come from polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, such as those found in some types of fish, nuts, and vegetable oils.
  • Check product labels for foods high in potassium (unless you’ve been advised to restrict the amount of potassium you eat). Potassium counteracts some of the effects of salt on blood pressure.
  • Choose foods and beverages low in added sugars. Read the ingredient list to make sure that added sugars are not among the first ingredients. Ingredients in the largest amounts are listed first. Some names for added sugars include sucrose, glucose, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, maple syrup, and fructose. The nutrition facts on the product label give the total sugar content.
  • Pick foods that provide dietary fiber, like fruits, beans, vegetables, and whole grains.

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This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

Sunday, November 20, 2011

GLUTEN FREE NATURAL PRODUCTS

Gluten (from Latin gluten "glue") is a protein composite processed from wheat and related species, including barley and rye used in foods. It gives elasticity to dough, helping it to rise and to keep its shape, and often giving the final product a chewy texture. There are many cases reported worldwide about gluten sensitivity. So, many foods  are now labeled whether they contain gluten as a component. Gluten is extracted from flour by draining out the starch.

Gluten free Around 1.0 percent of people in the United States are sensitive to gluten due to celiac disease. Allergies and neuropathies are also caused by gluten consumption

Some foods are naturally free of gluten. Here are some examples:

  • milk not flavored with ingredients that contain gluten, such as malt
  • 100 percent fruit or vegetable juices
  • fresh fruits and vegetables
  • butter
  • eggs
  • lentils
  • peanuts
  • seeds, such as flax
  • tree nuts, such as almonds
  • non-gluten-containing grains, such as corn
  • fresh fish, such as cod
  • fresh shellfish, such as clams
  • honey
  • water, including bottled, distilled, and spring

Source: FDA

Sunday, November 13, 2011

SUNDAY DIET MENU FOR RENAL PATIENTS

Renal Food Renal Dialysis Patients must take extreme care about having a healthy and balanced food.Consult your Doctor or Dietitian before starting this menu.

Sunday Breakfast for Renal patients

  • 120 ml Pineapple juice
  • Sliced Bread with half spoon jam  or butter
  • One boiled egg with 4 ounce black tea (with or without sugar)

Sunday Lunch for Renal patients

  • Noodles half cup.
  • Half cup cooked vegetables. If non vegetarian, 50gms of beef grilled.
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with carrot and cucumber.
  • One fresh fruit (apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes)

Sunday Evening menu for Renal patients

  • Biscuits and Tea without milk

Sunday Dinner for Renal Patients

  • 50 gm of grilled chicken
  • Macaroni with out salt
  • Half cup boiled vegetables
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with cauliflower

Then eat fresh fruit piece, such as apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes.

Saturday, November 05, 2011

SATURDAY DIET MENU FOR RENAL PATIENTS

RENAL FOOD MENUAsk your Dietitians and Doctors advice before following the below given Menu. Please note that, Diabetic patients must have sugar free diet. Patients with high cholesterol levels must reduce fat content and oily foods. Hypertensive patients must be careful in taking food with high salt content.

Saturday Breakfast for Renal patients

  • 4 ounce (120 ml) Lemon juice
  • Sliced Bread with half spoon jam  or butter
  • One boiled egg with 4 ounce black tea (with or without sugar)

Saturday Lunch for Renal patients

  • Half cup Macaroni or Noodles.
  • Half cup cooked vegetables. If non vegetarian, 50gms of chicken or beef.
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with onion and cucumber.
  • One fresh fruit (apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes)

Saturday Evening menu for Renal patients

  • Biscuits and Tea without milk

Saturday Dinner for Renal Patients

  • 50 gm of grilled liver
  • Bread or Macaroni  with out salt
  • Half cup boiled vegetables
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with carrot

After 10 minutes, eat fresh fruit piece, such as apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes.

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