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Friday, September 30, 2011

FRIDAY DIET MENU FOR RENAL PATIENTS

renal food menu In this post a full day menu for Renal Dialysis patients is explained as Friday Diet Menu for Renal Patients. Menu for other days are also available in this blog. Please view the blog archives to read menu for other week days. Kindly consult your Dietitian and Doctor, before following this diet.

Friday Breakfast for Renal patients

  • 120 ml Apple juice
  • 2 pieces  toast and cheese without salt
  • Half cup black tea (with or without sugar)

Friday Lunch for Renal patients

  • Half cup butter rice
  • Half cup cooked vegetables. If non vegetarian, 50gms of boiled duck.
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with cauliflower and cucumber.
  • One fresh fruit (apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes)

Friday Evening menu for Renal patients

  • Biscuits and Tea without milk

Friday Dinner for Renal Patients

  • 50 gm of Chicken Tikka
  • Half cup boiled vegetables
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with lettuce and carrot

After 10 minutes, take fresh fruit piece, such as apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes.

Monday, September 26, 2011

Barbecue Bliss: Keeping Bacteria at Bay

Summer brings out barbecue grills—and bacteria, which multiply in food faster in warm weather and can cause food borne illness (also known as food poisoning). Following a few simple guidelines can prevent an unpleasant experience.

Wash your hands

image Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling food. If you're eating where there’s no source of clean water, bring water, soap, and paper towels or have disposable wipes/hand sanitizer available.

Marinate food in the refrigerator

Don’t marinate on the counter—marinate in the refrigerator. If you want to use marinade as a sauce on cooked food, save a separate portion in the refrigerator. Do not reuse marinade that contacted raw meat, poultry, or seafood on cooked food unless you bring it to a boil first.

Keep raw food separate

Keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood in a separate cooler or securely wrapped at the bottom of a cooler so their juices won’t contaminate already prepared foods or raw produce. Don't use a plate or utensils that previously held raw meat, poultry, or seafood for anything else unless you wash them first in hot, soapy water. Have a clean platter and utensils ready at grill-side for serving.

Cook food thoroughly

Use a food thermometer to make sure food is cooked thoroughly to destroy harmful bacteria. Refer to the Safe Minimum Temperatures chart for safe internal temperatures for foods. Partial precooking in the microwave oven or on the stove is a good way to reduce grilling time—just make sure the food goes immediately on the preheated grill to finish cooking.

Keep hot food hot and cold food cold

Keep hot food at 140°F or above until served. Keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill, or wrap well and place in an insulated container.

Keep cold food at 40°F or below until served. Keep cold perishable food in a cooler until serving time. Keep coolers out of direct sun and avoid opening the lid often.

Cold foods can be placed directly on ice or in a shallow container set in a pan of ice. Drain off water as ice melts and replace ice frequently.

Don’t let hot or cold perishables sit out for longer than two hours, or one hour if the outdoor temperature is above 90°F. When reheating fully cooked meats, grill to 165°F or until steaming hot.

Transport food in the passenger compartment of the car where it’s cooler—not in the trunk.

Put these items on your list

These non-food items are indispensable for a safe barbecue.

  • food thermometer
  • several coolers: one for beverages (which will be opened frequently), one for raw meats, poultry, and seafood, and another for cooked foods and raw produce
  • ice or frozen gel packs for coolers
  • jug of water, soap, and paper towels for washing hands
  • enough plates and utensils to keep raw and cooked foods separate
  • foil or other wrap for leftovers

bacterial infection

 

This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

MONDAY DIET MENU FOR RENAL PATIENTS

RENAL MENU Think about a healthy food for Renal Dialysis Patients or Renal patients. Here is some idea for a combination diet. Kindly consider this as a suggestion. Please consult your Doctor or Dietitian before implementing this system. Renal patients with chronic diseases such as Diabetes, Hypertension, must strictly follow their physicians advice. Diabetic patients must have sugar free diet. Patients with high cholesterol levels must reduce fat content and oily foods. Hypertensive patients must be careful in taking food with high salt content.

Monday Breakfast for Renal patients

  • 4 ounce (120 ml) Apple juice
  • Sliced Bread with half spoon jam  or butter
  • One boiled egg with 4 ounce black tea (with or without sugar)

Monday Lunch for Renal patients

  • Cooked rice half cup.
  • Half cup cooked vegetables. If non vegetarian, 50gms of beef fried without oil.
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with lettuce and cucumber.
  • One fresh fruit (apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes)

Monday Evening menu for Renal patients

  • Biscuits and Tea without milk

Monday Dinner for Renal Patients

  • 50 gm of grilled liver
  • Bread or Macaroni or Noodles with out salt
  • Half cup boiled vegetables
  • Half cup fresh green salad filled with lettuce and carrot

After 10 minutes, eat fresh fruit piece, such as apple or pear or pineapple or cherry or grapes.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Arsenic and apple juice - Apple Juice is Safe To Drink

Arsenic and apple juice. Not words you like to see in the same sentence.There has been publicity recently over the amount of arsenic in the apple juice that many children drink. But the Food and Drug Administration has every confidence in the safety of apple juice.

apple juice and arsenic Donald Zink, Ph.D, senior science advisor at FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN), explains that arsenic is present in the environment as a naturally occurring substance or as a result of contamination from human activity.  It is found in water, air, food, and soil in organic and inorganic forms.As a result, small amounts of arsenic can be found in certain food and beverage products—including fruit juices and juice concentrates.“As a parent and grandparent myself, I understand the concern over recent reports that arsenic has been found in apple juice,” says Zink.

But, he says, there is no evidence of any public health risk from drinking these juices, Zink says. And FDA has been testing them for years.

 

Hunting Inorganic Arsenic

Organic arsenic is essentially harmless, according to Zink, but the inorganic kind can be harmful at high and long-term levels of exposure.

FDA has been tracking total arsenic contamination in apple and other juices for about six years, since foreign producers started gaining an increasing share of the juice market, says Henry Kim, Ph.D., a supervisory chemist at CFSAN.

The agency searches for potential contaminants in fruit juices and fruit juice concentrate in three ways:

  • FDA issues import alerts to keep potentially dangerous products from other countries out of the U.S. marketplace. The agency has issued a specific alert that requires importers to prove their fruit juices and concentrates are safe for consumption before they are allowed to enter the U.S.
  • As part of the FDA Total Diet Study program, the agency annually tests baby foods and apple juice samples for the presence of arsenic.
  • The agency collects and tests food and beverage samples in another program that looks for harmful substances in foods. Apple juice is one of the targeted products because investigators want to check for total and, if necessary, inorganic arsenic.

There is no evidence of any public health risk from drinking these juices. And FDA has been testing them for years.

 

Levels Set for Water

Why hasn’t FDA defined the point at which arsenic levels are unsafe in apple juice when such levels have been established for public drinking water and bottled water?

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set the arsenic standard for public drinking water at 10 parts per billion (ppb) to protect consumers from the effects of long-term exposure to arsenic, which could include skin damage, circulatory problems and an increased risk of cancer.

In concurrence with EPA, FDA has also set the arsenic standard at 10 ppb in bottled water.

So why not set safe levels for arsenic in apple juice?

Kim says that you can’t compare water and juice for several critical reasons. They include the fact that inorganic arsenic is the form found in drinking water, whereas organic arsenic is the form mostly found in food, including juices.

FDA will continue to test juices and juice concentrate and evaluate data provided by industry, consumer groups and government agencies, as well as data published in scientific literature. If the agency finds too much inorganic arsenic in any juice, it will take steps to remove that product from the market, says Zink.

Source: This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

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